The bad genetics excuse

The bad genetics excuse

Staff Writer

Every so often, we hear that excuse: I have bad genes. Yes, some people may have what we call defective genes. They probably won’t get the Mr. or Ms. Olympia shape, thin skin, washboard abs or perform like an Olympic athlete.

 

However, faulty genetics cannot, under no circumstances, be an excuse for not taking care of that body of yours. So, if you ever did use that excuse, stop it.

 

Your genes dictate who you are and your appearance. The color of your hair and your eyes, the length of your legs and your torso, even your creativity, and your personality.

 

Those genes have been passed to you. You inherited them from your parents and grandparents. That’s when it can become an issue. I often tell my clients that if they want to have children, even if it’s still too early for them to make any plan, they must realize that what they do now will have an impact on their kids’ health later on.

 

For example, these same defective genes are often passed on. Take the gene that helps the body produce hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an important protein needed by red blood cells to carry oxygen in the body. If parents pass on modified genes to their child, they may only be able to make one type of hemoglobin that will not work optimally, which usually leads to anemia.

 

To date, more than 400 different genes have been identified as a possible cause of obesity, although only a few appear to be real suspects. These genes can affect appetite, satiety, metabolism, food cravings, the distribution of fat in the body and the tendency to eat to manage stress.

 

If you have been overweight for an important part of your life, if several other members of your family are significantly overweight, it might be in the family. If both of your parents suffer from obesity, your chances of developing it increase by 80%.

 

On the other hand, it is not impossible to still get results by training. Many factors, often thought to be harmless, can greatly influence your results, despite poor genetics. Sometimes, when a flower does not grow, all you need is to change its environment, not the flower.

 

Coach Eric

@atp_labs

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