Sucralose in Supplements: The hidden “filler” that threatens your health?

Sucralose in Supplements: The hidden “filler” that threatens your health?

ATP LAB
By Dr. Dwayne N. Jackson, PhD
Does the supplement company you support use artificial chemical sweeteners? It’s easy to tell, you can look at the label, or just evaluate taste. Be honest, does your favorite preworkout, intraworkout, or postworkout supplements taste like sweet candy? Although flavor is one easy way to decide your favorite brand, I want to enlighten you on a big supplement formulation secret. Large doses of artificial sweeteners like sucralose and ACE-K are being pumped into supplements simply because these cheap and make flavoring easier—but, most of all, they make great hidden fillers and increase profit margins. If you use a sucralose sweetened supplement, serving for serving, you sacrifice a proportion of your active ingredients for cheap sweetener. Even more importantly, by ingesting the large amounts of sucralose found in chemically sweetened supplements, you are detracting from your gains in performance and health. If you haveIIIf IIIIISucrolose in your supplements? Supplement companies are slowly damaging your health to protect their bottom line. TheTtttttis a synthetic organochlorine sweetener (OC) that is a common ingredient in the world's food supply. Sucralose interacts with chemosensors in the alimentary tract that play a role in sweet taste sensation and hormone secretion. In rats, sucralose ingestion was shown to increase the expression of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and two cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isozymes in the intestine. P-gp and CYP are key components of the presystemic detoxification system involved in first-pass drug metabolism. The effect of sucralose on first-pass drug metabolism in humans, however, has not yet been determined. In rats, sucralose alters the microbial composition in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), with relatively greater reduction in beneficial bacteria. Although early studies asserted that sucralose passes through the GIT unchanged, subsequent analysis suggested that some of the ingested sweetener is metabolized in the GIT, as indicated by multiple peaks found in thin-layer radiochromatographic profiles of methanolic fecal extracts after oral sucralose administration. The identity and safety profile of these putative sucralose metabolites are not known at this time. Sucralose and one of its hydrolysis products were found to be mutagenic at elevated concentrations in several testing methods. Cooking with sucralose at high temperatures was reported to generate chloropropanols, a potentially toxic class of compounds. Both human and rodent studies demonstrated that sucralose may alter glucose, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels. Taken together, these findings indicate that sucralose is not a biologically inert compound.Sucralose is a synthetic organochlorine sweetener (OC) that is a common ingredient in the world's food supply. Sucralose interacts with chemosensors in the alimentary tract that play a role in sweet taste sensation and hormone secretion. In rats, sucralose ingestion was shown to increase the expression of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and two cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isozymes in the intestine. P-gp and CYP are key components of the presystemic detoxification system involved in first-pass drug metabolism. The effect of sucralose on first-pass drug metabolism in humans, however, has not yet been determined. In rats, sucralose alters the microbial composition in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), with relatively greater reduction in beneficial bacteria. Although early studies asserted that sucralose passes through the GIT unchanged, subsequent analysis suggested that some of the ingested sweetener is metabolized in the GIT, as indicated by multiple peaks found in thin-layer radiochromatographic profiles of methanolic fecal extracts after oral sucralose administration. The identity and safety profile of these putative sucralose metabolites are not known at this time. Sucralose and one of its hydrolysis products were found to be mutagenic at elevated concentrations in several testing methods. Cooking with sucralose at high temperatures was reported to generate chloropropanols, a potentially toxic class of compounds. Both human and rodent studies demonstrated that sucralose may alter glucose, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels. Taken together, these findings indicate that sucralose is not a biologically inert compound. been led to believe that sucralose is a healthy calorie free sweetener, you are not alone--- after all, sucralose is made from sugar and has no calories. Sucralose is produced from sucrose (table sugar) by chemically replacing its hydrogen-oxygen groups for chlorine atom.
Seems harmless, right? This chemical processing of sugar increases its sweetness 600x and eliminates its caloric load, which has misled the public to equate sucralose use with health. However, we now know that although sucralose is calorie free and very sweet, it actions in your body are far from “healthy”. Sucralose is considered a synthetic organochlorine sweetener (OC), which has become a major ingredient in the world's food chain. Sucralose interacts with chemosensors in the digestive tract that play a role in sweet taste sensation and hormone secretion. Early studies claimed that sucralose passes through the gastrointestinal tract unaltered---suggesting that it is not metabolized. It was these past studies that led us to believe sucralose was harmless and healthy. However, contrary to early reports, recent science illustrates that about 15% of ingested sucralose is digested and metabolized, producing different compounds in the body which impact can health. So, the more sucralose you take in, the greater the potential impact these sucralose metabolites. In the grand scheme, although a diet soda here and there may not show up on your health charts, chronic ingestion of large amounts of chemical sweeteners, like sucralose, will likely have a negative impact on your overall health down the road.
In recent years, the unnecessary addition of large amounts of sucralose and artificial sweeteners in fitness supplements has become epidemic. That’s right, under the guise of health and taste, chemical sweeteners are being added to most products simply as “tasty hidden fillers”. In a review published in The Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, several health concerns of sucralose were raised:
  1. Sucralose and one of its metabolic by-products were found to increase genetic mutations at elevated concentrations in several testing methods. You want to avoid mutagenic compounds, as they are initiators to diseases like cancer.
  2. Cooking with sucralose was reported produce compounds called chloropropanols, a potentially toxic class of compounds that are also linked to cancers and other alterations in biological processes.
  3. Sucralose has been shown to negatively impact gut flora and gut health by decreasing the number of healthy bacteria. Sucralose also modifies glucose handling through initiating insulin spikes and affecting glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels. This can be a major issue for those who engage in intermittent fasting for fat loss or in overweight individuals who are insulin insensitive or glucose intolerant.

Taken together, the above summary of findings indicate that sucralose is not the biologically inert compound we once thought it was.
Why are most supplement companies still using chemical sweeteners? Well, simply because chemical sweeteners are much cheaper and easier to flavor products with than the organic healthy alternatives like Stevia. Here’s the skinny:
FORMULATOR’S COST (per kilogram) FOR COMMON SWEETNERS IN FOUND YOUR SUPPLEMENTS ACE-K: $4.80 ASPARTAME: $6.20 ATP LAB’s Organic GMO Free Stevia: $200.00
That’s right! It costs 3000% to 4000% percent more to sweeten your products with healthy stevia! So, no wonder companies who still use chemical sweeteners tout the largest scoops and greatest taste.
At ATP LAB we use only organic non-GMO stevia in our products and since it’s so much more expensive than unhealthy chemical alternatives, we obviously use only what’s needed for taste. So, when comparing our products to others---gram for gram, you get less filler and more active ingredient. In the end, with ATP LAB supplements you get what you pay for---efficacious nutraceuticals, without detriment to your health.
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